Potatoes Feature image

Can You Eat Undercooked Potatoes?

In Food, In-depth Guides June 13th, 20210 Comments

This post may contain affiliate links for products I mention. If you click a link and buy something we may receive some compensation. This does not change the price you would pay. Learn more

Potatoes are a staple food in almost all kitchens in our society. It is a favorite for many people and there is a reason why. Potatoes can be cooked in different ways in different recipes to make them quite delicious and amazing. Even though the food is cooked using different methods, there might be some curiosity when it comes to eating undercooked potatoes.

You might have noticed that raw vegetables are considered a healthy choice for eating. However, undercooked potatoes are not always considered a great choice. So, what is the reason behind that? We have all the information you need about raw potatoes, how to recognize them, how to fix them, as well as the impacts they might have on your health. Keep reading for more insight.

Eating Undercooked or Raw Potatoes

As you might anticipate, the texture and flavor of undercooked potatoes are not appealing. When you cook your potatoes, you will reduce the level of starch inside. You will also make the potato tender.

When you eat a raw potato, you can expect a chalky consistency, as well as a bitter flavor. Nevertheless, you might realize that some people will eat them the same way you would eat an apple.

So, is it safe to eat undercooked potatoes? There are two main sides to this.

The Good Side

Potatoes have a certain resistant starch, which is a carbohydrate type that your body is not able to process. This type of starch is not digested or processed in your small intestines and instead ferments inside your large intestines. It is a good source of food for the healthy type of bacteria that is in your gut.

The healthy bacteria, also known as a microbiome, has an important task that is involved with the reduction of risk to diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, fibromyalgia, as well as multiple sclerosis.

Cooked potatoes are not a great source of that type of starch because the heat will break down the resistant starch.

The Bad Side

Can undercooked potatoes make you sick? The foods that are not easy to digest might lead to gastric distress. If you eat a large amount of resistant starch, there are chances of developing diarrhea, bloating, gas, as well as abdominal cramps. You can avoid these symptoms by increasing your intake gradually over some time. People who have conditions like irritable bowel syndrome cannot tolerate this type of starch.

So, can you eat undercooked potatoes? You can eat undercooked potatoes, but it is not recommended. There is a chance that you would completely okay after you eat undercooked potatoes and they are also not completely toxic. Nevertheless, there are reasons why eating undercooked potatoes might not be the best idea. They have a starchy texture that is coupled with a bitter flavor. But that’s not all. Ingesting them would cause some chances of some disruptions in your digestive system, which would then cause some serious issues.

Do Undercooked Potatoes Have Toxic Compounds?

Raw or undercooked potatoes have glycoalkaloids that would be toxic if they are ingested in large amounts. They would cause drowsiness, digestion problems, itchiness, cell disruption, abdominal pains, diarrhea, as well as increased sensitivity and vomiting. There are also chances of development of confusion, headaches, flushing, as well as fevers. In some extreme cases, it might lead to death.

When you cook, microwave, boil or bake your potatoes, you will reduce the concentration of glycoalkaloids, which will then make the potatoes good to eat.

Checking Undercooked Potatoes

So, how do you tell if a potato is undercooked? There is a very simple way of checking if the potato is undercooked. Simply pierce it with a fork. The fork will go inside the potato smoothly if it is cooked properly. Additionally, it will slide off the spoon or fork easily. This would be a great way to check if a dish that has potatoes is ready.

Remember, if you used a knife, you might be fooled. The reason is that it is sharp and will easily cut through the potato. A fork, on the other hand, is not sharp.

Fixing Undercooked Potatoes

You should learn how to fix undercooked potatoes because there are chances that you might undercook some at some point.

The process is quite simple. You should simply add some milk or cream and then cook them more with some low heat until you notice the softening of the lumps.

Additionally, you can simmer them inside a pot with water for around 15 minutes. The time would be different depending on the size of the potato.

Another simple way of fixing undercooked potatoes is microwaving them. If you notice that the potatoes are still warm or hot from the previous cooking, they will take less time.

Can you eat undercooked potatoes when pregnant?

You need to be careful about your eating habits when pregnant. There are risks associated with undercooked potatoes pregnancy, as highlighted below.

  • Ingesting glycoalkaloids found in raw potatoes would cause issues like diarrhea.
  • Green potatoes would cause congenital disabilities.
  • Rotten potatoes might lead to food poisoning.
  • Excessive consumption of potatoes can lead to obesity for pregnant women.

Conclusion

It might not be the best idea to eat undercooked or raw potatoes. In the same way, eating potatoes frequently, even when cooked, might still not be the best idea.

Potatoes are generally vegetables and eating raw vegetables might be a good idea, but it is not always the best choice when it comes to potatoes. The best thing would be to eat them after cooking them properly.

Also, read:

Feel free to share your observation with me in the comments section!

Also, if you find the information in this post to be useful, be sure to share this post with your friends on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.